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You are - and you must be - signs of contradiction

Archbishop Wenski's homily at first profession of vows of Servants of the Pierced Hearts

Archbishop Thomas Wenski preaches the homily at the profession of first vows of three Servants of the Pierced Hearts of Jesus and Mary, Dec. 11, 2020, at Our Lady of Guadalupe Church in Doral: Sister Anamargarita Maria, Sister Catherine Nazaret, and Sister Maria Belen.

Photographer: ROBERTO AGUIRRE | FC

Archbishop Thomas Wenski preaches the homily at the profession of first vows of three Servants of the Pierced Hearts of Jesus and Mary, Dec. 11, 2020, at Our Lady of Guadalupe Church in Doral: Sister Anamargarita Maria, Sister Catherine Nazaret, and Sister Maria Belen.

Archbishop Thomas Wenski preached this homily during the profession of first vows by several Servants of the Pierced Hearts of Jesus and Mary. The Mass took place Dec. 11, 2020, at Our Lady of Guadalupe Church in Doral.

The Pope Emeritus, Benedict XVI, once remarked: “Today, as in all ages, there is no lack of generous souls ready to give up everyone and everything to embrace Christ and His Gospel, consecrating their existence to His service with communities characterized by enthusiasm, generosity and joy.”

Tonight, these generous souls will profess their vows as sisters, as Servants of the Pierced Hearts of Jesus and Mary. Consecrated life is a witness of the search for God. Religious life is not about the seeking of self but rather the seeking of God. The only reason for this choice in life is to seek to know his will, to build a community of brothers and sisters in which God is sought after and loved before all else.

In the world, we see people who are concerned with their own autonomy, people jealous of their freedom, people fearful of losing their independence. In such a world, as religious sisters, you are — and you must be — signs of contradiction. Your existence — in the world but not of the world — points to the possibility of a different way of fulfillment of one’s life, “a way where God is the goal, his Word the light, and his will the guide, where consecrated persons move along peacefully in the certainty of being sustained by the hands of a Father who welcomes and provides, where they are accompanied by brothers and sisters, moved by the same Spirit, who wants to and knows how to satisfy the desires and longings sown by the Father in the heart of each one.”

Vatican II rightly emphasized all the baptized are called to holiness. Thus, all are equally called to follow Christ, to discover in him the ultimate meaning of our existence.

But the “consecrated” are the Church “concentrated” — as it were. Your lives as consecrated religious is at the very heart of the Church — because your radical embrace of the Gospel makes manifest the inner nature of every Christian’s calling. As the Church “concentrated,” you give us a unique witness to the implication of our own baptismal call to holiness. Your consecrated life is a gift to the Church that makes manifest the striving of the whole Church as Bride towards union with her one Spouse.

Or, in the words of the Second Vatican Council, “the ultimate norm of religious life is the following of Christ” (vitae religiosae ultima norma sequela Christi).

You vow to live the evangelical counsels: poverty, chastity and obedience and, in this particular institute, a fourth vow of total Marian availability through which each sister places her feminine genius and potentialities at the service of the Apostolic-Petrine Principle, which the world — and too often the faithful — see as simply renunciations. However, they are more than that — for each counsel in its own unique way is a specific acceptance of the Mystery of Christ lived out within the Church. As I said, you are the Church concentrated. And through you and your witness, the evangelical counsels — “characteristic features of Jesus, the chaste, poor, obedient one” — are made constantly visible in the midst of the world.

On behalf of all of us here, but also as the Archbishop of Miami, I thank our soon-to-be newly professed sisters for their enthusiasm, for their generosity, and for their joy. We bring all of this to the Lord — and to his table of sacrifice. May the Eucharist — during which we are privileged to gaze upon the face of the Lord — affirm you and strengthen you in your resolve to give up everybody and everything to embrace Christ and His Gospel.

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