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Immigrants: 'Our best and brightest'

Immigrants: 'Our best and brightest'

En la Epifanía, los Reyes Magos vinieron por el Niño

En la Epifanía, los Reyes Magos vinieron por el Niño

En la Misa con miembros de los Movimientos Apostólicos Hispanos

En la Misa con miembros de los Movimientos Apostólicos Hispanos

Cultures, people come together at Migration Mass

Cultures, people come together at Migration Mass

Pastoral Bulletin for January 2018

Pastoral Bulletin for January 2018

Cath·o·hól·ic

Prioritize access to steady employment

January 11, 2018

127. We are convinced that “man is the source, the focus and the aim of all economic and social life.” (Gaudium et Spes) Nonetheless, once our human capacity for contemplation and reverence is impaired, it becomes easy for the meaning of work to be misunderstood. (Centesimus Annus) We need to remember that men and women have “the capacity to improve their lot, to further their moral growth and to develop their spiritual endowments.” (Populorum Progressio) Work should be the setting for this rich personal growth, where many aspects of life enter into play: creativity, planning for the future, developing our talents, living out our values, relating to others, giving glory to God. It follows that, in the reality of today’s global society, it is essential that “we continue to prioritize the goal of access to steady employment for everyone,” (Caritas in Veritate) no matter the limited interests of business and dubious economic reasoning.

Source : Laudato Si'

Father Kirlin

St. Mary Magdalen Catholic Church

Are you a fast or slow listener?

Charles Swidoll relates a story about himself and his daughter Colleen. He says that he was always busy over his books and paperwork and had a ‘hurry-up’ lifestyle. Once Colleen wanted to tell him about a school event, and said, “Daddy, I want to tell you something, and I will tell you really fast.” “Honey”, he said, “you can tell me, and don’t have to say it fast. Say it slowly”. She replied, “Then listen slowly.”

Sometimes we can listen too fast, and so we do not really grasp what someone is trying to tell us. The same thing can be true in our relationship with God. We want God to tell us things quickly. At Mass, we may want the Scripture readings and homily to be done with so that we can leave church and get on with the other things we have planned for that day. In the 1st Reading, God calls the boy Samuel three times, but Samuel mistakes the voice of God for that of Eli the priest. When Eli realizes that it is God who has been calling Samuel, he tells the youth to respond in this way when the voice comes again: “Speak, Lord, your servant is listening.”

It is only by carefully listening to the Lord that we can know what He wants of us and what He wants us to do. Thus, Jesus in the Gospel passage sees two disciples of John the Baptist following Him and He asks them what they want. They want to know where He stays. He says to them, “Come and see”. They then go and listen to Jesus all that day. It is after listening to the Lord, they come to know Who He is and what His mission is. They then realize that they are meant to follow Him, not just out of curiosity, but to be His disciples.

The only way each of us can know what the Lord wants of us in life is if we allow Him to speak to us. If we do not, then we are simply following our own whims and can then be, not a disciple but a person who instructs the Lord. A young girl was applying for a college and was startled by a question that appeared on her entrance application. “Are you a leader?” She knew she wasn’t and said ‘no’. She expected the worst when she got her reply from the college. “Dear Applicant: A study of the application forms reveals that this year our college will have 1452 new leaders. We are accepting you because we feel that it is imperative that they have at least one follower.”

The Lord Jesus does not need people to lead Him or to act as consultants for His Church. What He needs are people who listen intently to Him, learn what “His Father’s business” is, and are content to follow Him. Our business as Christians is meant to be the same as that of Jesus. So, we must constantly listen and learn. Otherwise, we will have to hang out a sign like that which appeared on store. “Gone out of business. Didn’t know what our business was.”

In the 2nd Reading, St. Paul tells the Christians what their business is to be. “Do you not know that your bodies are members of Christ? Do you not know that your body is a temple of the Holy Spirit within you?” The business of every Christian is to act as a member of Christ’s Body—doing in our lives what He did in His—making room for others who, like lepers and sinners, were ostracized; forgiving our enemies; and, in big ways and small, sacrificing ourselves for others. To aid us in this mission, we have the Holy Spirit within. If we listen slowly to His promptings, we will, like Jesus, have the wisdom and strength to live the spiritual lives that God desires of each of us. And, in the end, we will experience the joy of listening to God—Father, Son, and Holy Spirit— as we walk with Him in Paradise.

Father Kirlin
Pastor

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