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Bishops announce 'Call-in Day' for Dreamers, Feb. 26

Bishops announce 'Call-in Day' for Dreamers, Feb. 26

Priest reflects on tragic shooting at Parkland high school

Priest reflects on tragic shooting at Parkland high school

What does the Church say about gun control?

What does the Church say about gun control?

En la apertura del Encuentro Regional de Pastoral Hispana

En la apertura del Encuentro Regional de Pastoral Hispana

La Renovación Carismática Católica, un encuentro espiritual

La Renovación Carismática Católica, un encuentro espiritual

Remember when...? for February 2018

Remember when...? for February 2018

Hundreds line up to apply for citizenship

Hundreds line up to apply for citizenship

Centro Mater turns 50

Centro Mater turns 50

Lenten advice: ‘Set your house in order’

Lenten advice: ‘Set your house in order’

Msgr. Franklyn Casale: Open mind, open blinds

Msgr. Franklyn Casale: Open mind, open blinds

Archdiocesan news briefs for February 2018

Archdiocesan news briefs for February 2018

Cath·o·hól·ic

On genetic modification

February 22, 2018

133. It is difficult to make a general judgement about genetic modification (GM), whether vegetable or animal, medical or agricultural, since these vary greatly among themselves and call for specific considerations. The risks involved are not always due to the techniques used, but rather to their improper or excessive application. Genetic mutations, in fact, have often been, and continue to be, caused by nature itself. Nor are mutations caused by human intervention a modern phenomenon. The domestication of animals, the crossbreeding of species and other older and universally accepted practices can be mentioned as examples. We need but recall that scientific developments in GM cereals began with the observation of natural bacteria which spontaneously modified plant genomes. In nature, however, this process is slow and cannot be compared to the fast pace induced by contemporary technological advances, even when the latter build upon several centuries of scientific progress.

Source : Laudato Si'

Rev. Juan J. Sosa

St. Joseph Church

The readings from this Sunday contain the themes of sacrifice and trust. In the First Reading, Abraham is called to trust in God when asked to sacrifice his son, Isaac. In the Second Reading, Saint Paul writes that the sacrifice of Abraham anticipates the sacrifice of Jesus on the cross, and that God never abandoned his only Son, just as he will never abandon us. The Gospel account of the Transfiguration tells us that there is only one thing for all to do: Thrust fully in God as the source of strength and life, the nourishment for all of Christ’s disciples. In the Gospel, Jesus shows the disciples a glimpse of glory to come, and the difficult path that will lead them there. He warns the disciples that they would encounter suffering and even death along the way, a reality they wished to ignore. But we must trust that the Lord knows our needs and provides us with enough to share with others. Without this trust, any follower may fall into the despair of frustration of one who is without faith at all.

This week, identify the challenges in your life, and invite testimonial from individuals in the parish community about ways in which the Holy Spirit has opened their hearts to trust in God in times of trial.

Rev. Juan J. Sosa
Pastor

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Upcoming Events

Carmelite Sisters Come and See Retreat

Feb
23

@ 4:00 PM

Archbishop Coleman Carroll HS

40 Days for Life

Feb
23

From 7:00 AM to 7:00 PM

Abortion site on US1 and Kendall Dr

YA Retreat - Strength In Mercy

Feb
23

@ 6:00 PM

Lake Placid Conference Center

Horizontes de Cristiandad

Feb
24

From 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM

St. Raymond Church

MACCW Scholarship luncheon

Feb
24

@ 11:30 AM

Embassy Suites Hotel

Women's Health and Fertility Seminar

Feb
24

From 9:00 AM to 3:30 PM

St. Thomas University

Study of Amoris Laetitia

Feb
28

From 3:00 PM to 5:30 PM

Immaculata- La Salle HS