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At Mass at Mercy Hospital for the Feast of Our Lady of Mercy

At Mass at Mercy Hospital for the Feast of Our Lady of Mercy

At Commissioning Mass of Diocesan Prison and Jail Ministry

At Commissioning Mass of Diocesan Prison and Jail Ministry

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Camillus House: Preaching 'louder with actions' than words

At Mass with catechists at La Ermita

At Mass with catechists at La Ermita

At Mass for the 2016 Priest Convocation

At Mass for the 2016 Priest Convocation

Co-Chair of the National Catholic-Muslim Dialogue Calls for Positive Engagement

Co-Chair of the National Catholic-Muslim Dialogue Calls for Positive Engagement

Art and history on display at St. Thomas U.

Art and history on display at St. Thomas U.

You are invited to watch: A Legacy of Faith

You are invited to watch: A Legacy of Faith

St. Louis Parish dedicates multipurpose center

St. Louis Parish dedicates multipurpose center

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New ‘ship’ of learning sets sail at St. Brendan High

St. Mary Star of the Sea dedicates refurbished parish center

St. Mary Star of the Sea dedicates refurbished parish center

Serving the sick in Lourdes: ‘It does something in your heart’

Serving the sick in Lourdes: ‘It does something in your heart’

Here are resources for 'faithful citizenship' during election season

Here are resources for 'faithful citizenship' during election season

Cath·o·hól·ic

Fr. Michael W. Davis

CHURCH OF THE LITTLE FLOWER

Twenty-Sixth Sunday in Ordinary Time : September 25, 2016

In God’s mercy, we are given the gifts of life, and time and eternity. Our Gospel reading this weekend challenges us to be sure that our spiritual focus on these precious gifts is clear, lest we get distracted.

The temptation in a world filled with attractions of all types, and of lights contrary to the Gospel, is that we can easily forget the connectedness that this life has to the next, and fail to cultivate our spiritual grounding in what really matters. Complacency is, and will always be, a great spiritual danger to us, if we are not vigilant. The Lord in his gracious love simply wants what’s best for us. He tells us the end -game before it even happens. The disciple who maintains clarity on his spiritual life, and pursues the virtues that unite us with God, will have nothing to fear at the life’s end. The person, however, who immerses himself in worldliness and in its fleeting power, pleasure, prestige, popularity, and possessions, may well find himself with the consequences of eternal regret. Life is beautiful. But even good things can be ruined. The Gospel today underscores the point that, even as the Lord reveals his mercy, there will be accountability, especially for those who were complacent.

Accountability is when we take personal responsibility for our actions, choices, and obligations. This is especially true for the baptized person of faith. Members of God’s household are asked to always be responsible. Judgment is the ultimate “accounting” of our lives before God. At life’s end, each person will be held accountable and will face judgment after death which will determine his or her everlasting reward or punishment. This personal judgment takes place immediately after death (cf. Heb.9:27). The Scriptures warn us repeatedly, quoting Christ and the Apostles, about the everlasting importance of our lives, so that we do not become complacent. It would be spiritually dangerous for us to not be vigilant.

There will also be a general judgment of all people at the end of time. Christ told us that this judgment will occur at his final coming in glory. The basis of this accounting will be our own personal acts and deeds and how these actions have affected other people. This flows from our nature. We are social beings, responsible not only for ourselves, but for the well-being of others. At this general judgment, the fruits of our deeds, good or bad, will be made known in the presence of all to show forth God’s mercy and to glorify the repentant sinner.

Often, we are too easily preoccupied with temporal concerns which are fleeting by their very nature. Consequently, and unfortunately, we neglect God, who is the ultimate goal of our lives. Jesus is quoted in Scripture as telling us that the pure of heart will see God, that is, those with single-hearted focus on the matters of God, and on our life in him, will be with him eternally. Those who die in a state of grace, yet whose hearts are not free of all attachments, however, will need to be purified. Purgatory is that place of purgative preparation to be with the Lord eternally. It is a place of God’s mercy, preparing sinners for unending joy, similar to a cleanup before a banquet. Our prayers are meritorious for those that can no longer help themselves. Our prayers can hasten the progress of souls through purgatory. But there is also the place of permanent separation from God. The rich man in todays’ Gospel passage waited too long and found himself on the other side of the chasm. He could only regret that he had been so complacent in life, and now must live with the consequence and accountability of his wayward use of time.

May we always avoid spiritual complacency. May we be vigilant, staying focused on the precious gifts of life, time and eternity.

A variety of opinions

September 25, 2016

60. Finally, we need to acknowledge that different approaches and lines of thought have emerged regarding this situation and its possible solutions. At one extreme, we find those who doggedly uphold the myth of progress and tell us that ecological problems will solve themselves simply with the application of new technology and without any need for ethical considerations or deep change. At the other extreme are those who view men and women and all their interventions as no more than a threat, jeopardizing the global ecosystem, and consequently the presence of human beings on the planet should be reduced and all forms of intervention prohibited. Viable future scenarios will have to be generated between these extremes, since there is no one path to a solution. This makes a variety of proposals possible, all capable of entering into dialogue with a view to developing comprehensive solutions.

Source : Laudato Si’’

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