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On Giving Tuesday, ‘Give Catholic’

On Giving Tuesday, ‘Give Catholic’

College students march for farmworkers’ rights

College students march for farmworkers’ rights

Thanksgiving, immigrants and blessings

Thanksgiving, immigrants and blessings

Pope: No 'chit-chat' before Mass

Pope: No 'chit-chat' before Mass

'Michelangelos of Miami' on exhibit at St. Thomas U.

'Michelangelos of Miami' on exhibit at St. Thomas U.

Keeping up with the bishops at their fall meeting

Keeping up with the bishops at their fall meeting

Cath·o·hól·ic

Can’t heal nature without healing human, God relationships

November 16, 2017

119. Nor must the critique of a misguided anthropocentrism underestimate the importance of interpersonal relations. If the present ecological crisis is one small sign of the ethical, cultural and spiritual crisis of modernity, we cannot presume to heal our relationship with nature and the environment without healing all fundamental human relationships. Christian thought sees human beings as possessing a particular dignity above other creatures; it thus inculcates esteem for each person and respect for others. Our openness to others, each of whom is a “thou” capable of knowing, loving and entering into dialogue, remains the source of our nobility as human persons.

A correct relationship with the created world demands that we not weaken this social dimension of openness to others, much less the transcendent dimension of our openness to the “Thou” of God. Our relationship with the environment can never be isolated from our relationship with others and with God. Otherwise, it would be nothing more than romantic individualism dressed up in ecological garb, locking us into a stifling immanence.

Source : Laudato Si'

Fr. José Luis Menéndez

Corpus Christi Church

Thirty-Third Sunday in Ordinary Time

It has always been difficult to understand that from the one who has nothing even the little he has will be taken away, while the one who has much will receive more. To put it simply, it means that the one who works harder will receive more from the fruit of his labors, while the one who doesn’t work will eventually lose what he had at the beginning.

This Sunday’s Gospel invites us to be bold, to be daring in serving God, to negotiate without fear the talents the Lord has placed in our hands. There is an old Spanish saying: “The one who risks nothing, neither loses nor wins.” But according to what we just read, not taking a risk and burying, because of fear, the talents of the Lord always represents a loss because it deprives us of our friendship with God, the greatest loss we can suffer in this world.

All fields of human society are begging for men, women, young people and children to be a sign of salvation and of hope. Every profession can present the opportunity to give witness. The parable of the talents encourages us to discover within ourselves this hidden strength of God and to place it at his service and at the service of our brothers and sisters. In so doing, we will have found the way to happiness both in this life and in eternity. Happy Thanksgiving!

Fr. José Luis Menéndez
Pastor

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