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4th of July Mass with Archbishop Wenski

Florida Catholic newspaper earns five national awards

Florida Catholic newspaper earns five national awards

Florida Keys road trip for religious freedoms

Florida Keys road trip for religious freedoms

St. Martin de Porres celebra 25 años

St. Martin de Porres celebra 25 años

What will Pope Francis do in U.S.?

What will Pope Francis do in U.S.?

Detalles de la visita del Papa Francisco a Cuba en septiembre

Detalles de la visita del Papa Francisco a Cuba en septiembre

Archbishop Wenski renews fingerprints

Archbishop Wenski renews fingerprints

Remembering the departed

Remembering the departed

Young adults' 'hearts are ready' for ministry

Young adults' 'hearts are ready' for ministry

En Misa con la Asociación Cubana de los Caballeros de Malta

En Misa con la Asociación Cubana de los Caballeros de Malta

On Supreme Court's decision on same-sex marriage

On Supreme Court's decision on same-sex marriage

Supreme Court decision on marriage 'a tragic error'

Supreme Court decision on marriage 'a tragic error'

Download a copy of Pope Francis' Encyclical here

Download a copy of Pope Francis' Encyclical here

Details finalized for papal pilgrimages

Details finalized for papal pilgrimages

Cath·o·hól·ic

Gospel reading Mark 6:1-6 7

Fourteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time : July 5, 2015

Jesus departed from there and came to his native place, accompanied by his disciples. When the Sabbath came he began to teach in the synagogue, and many who heard him were astonished. They said, “Where did this man get all this? What kind of wisdom has been given him? What mighty deeds are wrought by his hands! Is he not the carpenter, the son of Mary, and the brother of James and Joses and Judas and Simon? And are not his sisters here with us?”

And they took offense at him. Jesus said to them, “A prophet is not without honor except in his native place and among his own kin and in his own house.” So he was not able to perform any mighty deed there, apart from curing a few sick people by laying his hands on them. He was amazed at their lack of faith.

Click here to read a brief commentary >>

Msgr. Vincent Kelly

St. John The Baptist

Fourteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time : July 5, 2015


Remember me

Dear Family,

At one time or another, all of us have likely been ignored or passed over. This can be very painful. We may feel that our work is not recognized and we ourselves are treated as if we did not really count. But sometimes, worse can happen to us than to be ignored. We could be forgotten. It is to be treated as if we did not exist.

Jesus, too, wanted to be remembered. The night before He died, He sat at a table with His friends, He took bread, and He said, "This is my body given for you." Then, He took the cup filled with wine and said, "This is the cup of my blood… Do this in memory of me."

Jesus was not just thinking of His own need to be remembered, but He was also thinking about His disciples and future believers. They, too, needed to remember Him. In His loving care, He left them a special way of remembering Him, namely, the Eucharist.

Every time we celebrate the Eucharist, we recall some of the wonderful things Jesus said and did. But the Eucharist is more wonderful still. When we remember Him in this way, He becomes present to us: not physically present, but nevertheless, really present. Through the Eucharist, a spiritual bond is developed between us. We are not merely in communication with Him, but in communion with Him.

Memory is a precious faculty. It connects us with people and events that are no longer present to us. If we cherish the memory of our loved ones, they become present to us. They are not just a memory, but a presence we feel rather than see. May we remember Jesus, especially in the way He asked to be remembered. Our respectful reception of the Holy Eucharist brings Christ, our Savior, into our lives today and every day.

Blessings,

Father Vincent T. Kelly

Sacraments: Holy Orders (part 2)

July 2, 2015

“The divinely instituted ecclesiastical ministry is exercised in different degrees by those who even from ancient times have been called bishops, priests and deacons.” (Lumen Gentium 28, Catechism 1554)

Catholic doctrine, expressed in the liturgy, the Magisterium, and the constant practice of the Church, recognizes that there are two degrees of ministerial participation in the priesthood of Christ: the episcopacy and the presbyterate. The diaconate is intended to help and serve them. For this reason, the term “sacerdos” in current usage denotes bishops and priests but not deacons.

Yet Catholic doctrine teaches that the degrees of priestly participation (episcopate and presbyterate) and the degree of service (deaconate) are all three conferred by a sacramental act called “ordination”; that is, by the sacrament of Holy Orders:

  • “Let everyone revere the deacons as Jesus Christ, the bishop as the image of the Father, and the presbyters as the senate of God and the assembly of the apostles. For without them, one cannot speak of the Church.” (St. Ignatius of Antioch)

Source: Fountain of Grace, published by archdiocesan Office of Lay Ministry

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