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Pastoral Bulletin for December 2017

Pastoral Bulletin for December 2017

New bishop’s family comes from Peru to celebrate ordination

New bishop’s family comes from Peru to celebrate ordination

En la Solemnidad de Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe

En la Solemnidad de Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe

Líderes bipartidistas hablan sobre la Reforma Migratoria

Líderes bipartidistas hablan sobre la Reforma Migratoria

‘A bishop for the people’ and a ‘servant of the Lord’

‘A bishop for the people’ and a ‘servant of the Lord’

Chaminade-Madonna wins third state football title

Chaminade-Madonna wins third state football title

The meaning behind the symbols

The meaning behind the symbols

A joyful vespers at St. Katharine Drexel

A joyful vespers at St. Katharine Drexel

Bishop Delgado gives his views on ministry — and his favorite film and TV

Bishop Delgado gives his views on ministry — and his favorite film and TV

Cath·o·hól·ic

The dangers of ‘use and throw away’ logic

December 14, 2017

123. The culture of relativism is the same disorder which drives one person to take advantage of another, to treat others as mere objects, imposing forced labor on them or enslaving them to pay their debts. The same kind of thinking leads to the sexual exploitation of children and abandonment of the elderly who no longer serve our interests. It is also the mindset of those who say: Let us allow the invisible forces of the market to regulate the economy, and consider their impact on society and nature as collateral damage.

  • In the absence of objective truths or sound principles other than the satisfaction of our own desires and immediate needs, what limits can be placed on human trafficking, organized crime, the drug trade, commerce in blood diamonds and the fur of endangered species?
  • Is it not the same relativistic logic which justifies buying the organs of the poor for resale or use in experimentation, or eliminating children because they are not what their parents wanted?

This same “use and throw away” logic generates so much waste, because of the disordered desire to consume more than what is really necessary. We should not think that political efforts or the force of law will be sufficient to prevent actions which affect the environment because, when the culture itself is corrupt and objective truth and universally valid principles are no longer upheld, then laws can only be seen as arbitrary impositions or obstacles to be avoided.

Source : Laudato Si'

Fr. David Zirilli

Nativity Church

Third Sunday of Advent

The Nativity Scene

The Nativity Scene is an enduring and beautiful part of our Advent and Christmas traditions, as it has been for nearly 800 years, since the first such scene was displayed. It was the beloved St. Francis of Assisi who is credited with creating the first ever Nativity Scene. On Christmas Eve, in the year 1223, St. Francis asked for, and received, permission from Pope Honorius III to make a special recreation of the Lord’s birth as part of the celebration of Mass. He was inspired to create the Nativity Scene after visiting the actual place of the Lord’s birth in the Holy Land, a pilgrimage that deepened his devotion to the Child Jesus. As he told a friend at the time: “I want to do something that will recall the memory of that Child who was born in Bethlehem, to see with bodily eyes the inconveniences of his infancy, how he lay in the manger, and how the ox and ass stood by.”

Francis set up a manger inside a cave in the city of Grecio in Italy, and brought in hay and live animals, just as it was believed to have looked on that first Christmas night. In this way, Francis sought to teach the people how Christ had come into the world, in poverty and simplicity. The rest is history. St. Francis’ recreation of the first Christmas night became so popular that soon every church in Italy had its own Nativity Scene. From there, it spread throughout all of Christendom.

Our parish and home Nativity scenes recall to our minds the Incarnation of Jesus Christ and the moment when God Himself entered into the world, the Creator taking on the flesh of the created, sharing in our humanity that we might share in His divinity. As Pope St. Leo the Great in the fifth century said of coming of Christ: “Lowliness is assumed by majesty, weakness by power, mortality by eternity. To pay the debt of our sinful state, a nature that is incapable of suffering was joined to one that could suffer

The Nativity Scene is thus more than a pretty Christmas decoration. As it was 800 years ago, it is today an invitation to prayer and meditation about the humility of Christ, who shed the glory of his divinity to take on human flesh and a human soul, setting into motion his plan to save and redeem us.

Fr. David Zirilli
Pastor

Archbishop Thomas Wenski Homilies Columns Podcasts

Upcoming Events

Natural Family Planning

Dec
14

@ 7:30 PM

Epiphany Church

Pilgrimage to World Meeting of Families in Ireland

Dec
14

From 7:00 PM to 8:30 PM

The Archdiocese of Miami

Espectacular Concierto de Navidad 2017

Dec
15

@ 7:30 PM

Santa Barbara Church

Simbang Gaby 2017: Sharing the Journey

Dec
15

@ 7:30 PM

Various churches

Celestial Christmas...Choral Concert

Dec
16

@ 7:30 PM

Little Flower Church (Coral Gables)

Advent Taizé Prayer Service

Dec
17

From 2:00 PM to 5:00 PM

CENTRO POVEDA

'The Messiah' Concert

Dec
17

From 7:00 PM to 10:00 PM

Our Lady of the Holy Rosary-St. Richard Church